Music

TV Review: American Masters, "LENNONYC"

john-lennon-peace

I don’t know about you, but 30 years after his death the mere sound of John Lennon’s voice is still enough to fill me with emotion. An enormous talent was lost to the world on that long ago December night, and more than that a powerful voice for peace was silenced.

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TV Review: American Masters, "LENNONYC" (PBS) | Popdose
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Blu-ray Review: The Rolling Stones, "Ladies and Gentlemen the Rolling Stones"

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Considering that the Rolling Stones aren’t touring, and that there has been no new music from them recently, 2010 has turned out to be a pretty big year for Stones fans. Earlier this year, we got a splendid reissue of what is arguably the band’s best album,
Exile On Main Street, complete with 10 previously unreleased tracks. Then in June we got Stones In Exile, a terrific documentary about the making of Exile. Now Eagle Rock Entertainment has released the final piece of the puzzle, the thoroughly captivating Ladies & Gentlemen the Rolling Stones.

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Blu-ray Review: The Rolling Stones, "Ladies & Gentlemen the Rolling Stones" | Popdose
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Cratedigger: Elton John, "Madman Across the Water"


madman2

Madman Across the Water opens with one of the most powerful one-two punches in any artist’s catalog. First comes “Tiny Dancer,” (written about and dedicated to Bernie Taupin’s then girlfriend Maxine Feibelman) which made it to #41 on the Billboard US Pop Singles Chart, and has become something of a cultural touchstone. That’s followed up by the massive hit “Levon,” #24 on that same chart. It’s hard to follow that kind of opening, but follow it Elton John did to create one my favorite albums of his long and distinguished career.

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Cratedigger: Elton John, "Madman Across the Water" | Popdose
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CD Review: Angie Mattson, "Skeleton Arm" | Popdose

angiemattson

Let’s face it, being the opening act on a show is a pretty thankless job. Yes, it does give an artist an opportunity to reach an audience that she otherwise could not reach, but more often than not, that audience doesn’t care to listen. It’s rare indeed when an opening act manages to cut through the ennui (and sometimes outright hostility) and impress an audience. So a couple of years ago when I went to Atlantic City to see Justin Currie on his first solo US tour a couple, I really had no expectations, and even less interest in the opening act, a singer/songwriter by the name of Angie Mattson. As you’ve probably figured out by now, it turned out to be one of those rare nights. Mattson delivered a memorable set under difficult circumstances, and made a bunch of new fans.

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CD Review: Angie Mattson, "Skeleton Arm" | Popdose http://popdose.com/cd-review-angie-mattson-skeleton-arm

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Soul Serenade: Solomon Burke, "Got To Get You Off My MInd" | Popdose

solomonburke

In July, 2002 I was in Philadelphia for WXPN’s Singer/Songwriter Festival. Now the great radio station always throws a good party, but there was a very special reason for being there that year; the King of Rock n’ Soul himself, Solomon Burke, was appearing in what amounted to a late-career homecoming show. King Solomon was born in Philadelphia in the year 1936, 1938, or 1940, depending on who you believe.

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Soul Serenade: Solomon Burke, "Got To Get You Off My Mind" | Popdose http://popdose.com/soul-serenade-solomon-burke-got-to-get-you-off-my-mind

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John Lennon: Real Love, The Artist At 70 | Popdose

john-lennon-peace

John Lennon would have been 70 years old today. It’s been nearly 30 years since his tragic death in New York City, and the world continues to mourn his loss. Some of the Popdose staff has gathered together to pay tribute to the man who meant so much to us.

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John Lennon: Real Love, The Artist at 70 | Popdose http://popdose.com/john-lennon-real-love-the-artist-at-70

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Cratedigger: Ben Folds and Nick Hornby, "Lonely Avenue" | Popdose

lonelyavenue

The news of an impending collaboration between indie music darling Ben Folds and the acclaimed British novelist Nick Hornby was intriguing to say the least. That collaboration has now resulted in an album called Lonely Avenue, and I’m pleased to report that it more than lives up to expectations.

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Cratedigger: Ben Folds and Nick Hornby, "Lonely Avenue" (Win a Copy!) | Popdose http://popdose.com/cratedigger-ben-folds-and-nick-hornby-lonely-avenue-win-a-copy

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Soul Serenade: Dionne Warwick, "Anyone Who Had A Heart" | Popdose

dionneanyone

In 1962, Burt Bacharach and Hal David signed Dionne Warwick to their production company after Bacharach heard her sing background on a Drifters song that he had written. Bacharach and David were in turn signed to Scepter Records. Together, their amazing string of hit singles began with the November, 1962 release of “Don’t Make Me Over,” which reached #21 on the pop chart, and #4 on the R&B chart. But it was Warwick’s fourth single, audio_mp3_play“Anyone Who Had A Heart”, that became her first top ten hit, reaching #8 on the Billboard Hot 100 in January, 1964. A few months later, in April of that year, the follow-up single “Walk On By” made Warwick an international star.

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Soul Serenade: Dionne Warwick, "Anyone Who Had A Heart" | Popdose http://popdose.com/soul-serenade-dionne-warwick-anyone-who-had-a-heart

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CD Review: Robert Plant, "Band of Joy" | Popdose

band of joy

I’ve never been as much of a Led Zeppelin fan as, well, pretty much everyone that I know. Oh sure, there are definitely Zeppelin songs that I like, but that often has more to do with something Jimmy Page plays, or the epic power of John Bonham’s drumming, than it does with Robert Plant’s vocals. There are exceptions. For example, I think that Plant’s vocal performance on the live version of “Since I’ve Been Loving You” from The Song Remains the Same is fantastic. But overall, Robert Plant has never done much for me.

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CD Review: Robert Plant, "Band of Joy" | Popdose http://popdose.com/cd-review-robert-plant-band-of-joy

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CD Review: Justin Townes Earle, "Harlem River Blues" | Popdose

jteharlem

Not long ago, Justin Townes Earle took up residence in New York City. When I interviewed him awhile back, he sang the praises of the city, and seemed to be very happy with his move. However when it came time to record his third album, Harlem River Blues (Bloodshot Records), he returned to his hometown of Nashville to record at the House of David studio.

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CD Review: Justin Townes Earle, "Harlem River Blues" | Popdose http://popdose.com/cd-review-justin-townes-earle-harlem-river-blues

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DVD Review: "Legends of the Canyon" | Popdose


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Another week, another great Popdose contest. Read through to the end to find out how to win your very own copy of the Legends of the Canyon documentary.

Legends of the Canyon is a new documentary based on the memories of the great photographer Henry Diltz. The film traces the history of the Laurel Canyon music community, one of the most successful and important such communities in the history of American music.

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DVD Review: "Legends of the Canyon" | Popdose http://popdose.com/dvd-review-legends-of-the-canyon-win-a-copy
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Soul Serenade: Al Wilson, "Show and Tell" | Popdose

alwilson

“Show and Tell” is just one of those songs that thrills me whenever it comes on the radio. It’s been doing that since Al Wilson released it in 1973. I was only vaguely aware of the original version, written by Jerry Fuller and released by Johnny Mathis the previous year. It’s Wilson’s version that has stuck with me, and no wonder. The single was a massive hit, reaching #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 on January 19, 1974, and selling over two million copies. Cashbox named “Show and Tell” a top single of the year.

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Soul Serenade: Al Wilson, "Show and Tell" | Popdose
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Ryan Bingham & The Dead Horses, "Junky Star" | Popdose

ryanbingham

I don’t think I’ve used the word ‘astonishing’ in relation to an album in a long time. But the new Ryan Bingham album, Junky Star (Lost Highway), merits that kind of acclaim. Another thing that I never do is compare any songwriter to Bob Dylan. But the inescapable fact is that Bingham may be the songwriter who finally justifies the “new Dylan” tag that has cursed so many talented songwriters in the past. It’s not just the songs, which are powerful in their own right, but the way that they’re delivered. Bingham is possessed on a raspy, heartbroken voice that provides every ounce of world-weary despair that the occasion calls for.

Read more: CD Review: Ryan Bingham & the Dead Horses, "Junky Star" | Popdose
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Soul Serenade: The Originals, "The Bells" | Popdose

originals

Last week, as you will no doubt recall, Soul Serenade focused on the great Laura Nyro and her song “Timer.” This week’s column has a Laura Nyro connection as well. When I first heard “The Bells” it was Laura’s version from her wondrous 1971 covers album Gonna Take A Miracle, which she recorded with the vocal group LaBelle. I liked the song so much that I went in search of the original version which was by, oddly enough, the Originals.

Read more: Soul Serenade: The Originals, "The Bells" | Popdose
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DVD Review: "The Complete Ed Sullivan Shows Starring The Beatles | Popdose

beatlessullivan

The Ed Sullivan Show ran on CBS from 1948 – 1971. The show was broadcast live in the Eastern and Central time zone. Fortunately for us, it was shown on tape to in the Pacific and Mountain time zones. Sullivan presented a potpourri of the leading show biz acts of the day, including singers, dancers, comedians, acrobats, jugglers, and a small Italian mouse called Topo Gigio. It was the biggest tv show of its time, and a must for any ambitious performer.

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DVD Review: "The Ed Sullivan Shows Starring The Beatles" | Popdose
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Cratedigger: Grateful Dead, "Workingman's Dead" | Popdose

workingmans

The first guy I met in college had a plastic bag filled with powdered mescaline (at least that’s what he said it was), and a plastic jug filled with empty capsules. The second guy I met was a veteran of the hallucinogenic wars who was determined to instruct me on the proper use of the aforementioned powder and capsules. Hey, what can I tell you? It was the ’60s. Number one on my would-be mentors list was the music of the Grateful Dead. In his opinion, their music was a must for any successful trip. I had heard their first three albums, and I wasn’t a fan. When it came to San Francisco bands, I preferred the hard-charging fury of the Jefferson Airplane to the psychedelic ramblings of the Dead.

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Cratedigger: Grateful Dead, "Workingman's Dead" | Popdose
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Soul Serenade: Laura Nyro, "Timer" | Popdose

laurasoul

I have written extensively about Laura Nyro for Popdose. There was my review of the splendid Iconoclassic reissue of her live album Season of Light, and more recently, a review of One Child Born, a one-woman show devoted to Nyro’s music. The bottom line is that I have been a fan of her music since the ’60s, and yet somehow fan doesn’t seem like a strong enough word. I’ve turned to Laura Nyro on dark days for more than 40 years, and I’ve always found comfort and compassion there. There are few people whose music has meant more to me over the years.

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Soul Serenade: Laura Nyro, "Timer" | Popdose
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CD Review: Miles Davis, "Bitches Brew: 40th Anniversary Edition" | Popdose

bitchesbrew

Miles Davis once quipped that he had changed the course of jazz “four or five times.” If you know anything about jazz, and I don’t profess to know much, you know that it was no idle boast. One of those times came with the release of Bitches Brew in April 1970. These days, no significant album release anniversary seems to go by without the release of an expanded, remastered, repackaged, revised re-release, and for the most part, that turns out to be a very good thing. In fact, these releases are often the only rays of light coming from a music industry that is in the throes of a long and protracted demise. What the major labels have is catalog. Eventually, that may be all they have. So why not make the most of it as Sony Legacy has done with the 40th Anniversary reissue of Bitches Brew.

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CD Review: Miles Davis, "Bitches Brew - 40th Anniversary Edition" | Popdose
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Soul Serenade: The Delfonics, "Didn't I (Blow Your Mind This Time)" | Popdose

delfonics

The other day I was listening to my favorite radio show, Ron & Fez, on satellite radio. The discussion turned to Quentin Tarantino’s film music. As one example after another was played, I realized that as unlikely as it may seem, Tarantino has actually surpassed the great Martin Scorcese when it comes to the use of music in his films.

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Soul Serenade: The Delfonics, "Didn't I (Blow Your Mind This Time) | Popdose
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Cratedigger: Danger Mouse & Sparklehorse, "Dark Night of the Soul" | Popdose

dnots

Ok vinyl lovers. I have something very special for you this week. If you’re reading this column, chances are you own, and use, a turntable. If not, read on anyway. The prize I’m offering in this contest would make a great gift for the vinyl lover in your life. In fact, it’s so good that you may want to actually buy yourself a turntable so that you can hear it.

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Cratedigger: Danger Mouse & Sparklehorse, "Dark Night of the Soul" | Popdose
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Soul Serenade: The Temptations, "You're My Everything" | Popdose


temptations

It’s surprising to me that we’re now several months into Soul Serenade, and I have yet to feature a track by the Temptations. They are, after all, my favorite soul vocal group, and one of my favorite acts of any genre ever. I did feature a David Ruffin track (“Walk Away From Love”) in week three, but that was from his solo years after he left the group.

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Soul Serenade: The Temptations, "You're My Everything" | Popdose
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CD Review: Brian Wilson, "Brian Wilson Reimagines Gershwin" | Popdose

wilsongershwin

The idea of a collaboration between two of America’s greatest composers is one that is intriguing, but also fraught with peril. The biggest problem is that the music of George Gershwin is completely familiar to even the most casual music fan in this country. We’ve heard it in concert halls and cocktail bars for our entire lives. We’ve heard wonderful cover versions of Gershwin songs, and some pretty bad ones. So for Brian Wilson the question becomes, if you’re going to do an album of Gershwin music, what are you going to bring to the project that’s new?

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CD Review: Brian Wilson, "Brian Wilson Reimagines Gershwin" | Popdose
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Live Music: 2010 Newport Folk Festival, Part Two | Popdose

sharonsm

If anything, the final day of the 2010 Newport Folk Festival was even more beautiful than the day before, and Newport Harbor was at the height of its midsummer glory. Arriving early has its benefits, as not only were we able to avoid the traffic that builds up later in the day, we were also treated to an ad hoc performance by What Cheer? Brigade, a 19-piece brass band from nearby Providence that somehow mixes elements of Balkan, Bollywood, Latin, and New Orleans music into a wonderfully uplifting stew. What Cheer?’s job was to wander the grounds over the weekend, turning up here and there, and whenever they did, it was a delight.

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Live Music: Newport Folk Festival 2010, Part Two | Popdose
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Live Music: 2010 Newport Folk Festival, Part One | Popdose

dawesweb

George Wein started the Newport Folk Festival in 1959, and though economic difficulties caused the festival to close down in 1971, it was revived in 1985, and it’s been running continuously ever since. One of the great joys of the current festival is to see Mr. Wein, who turns 85 in October, in attendance at various performances, still intently focused on the music.

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Live Music: 2010 Newport Folk Festival - Part One | Popdose
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Arcade Fire: "Ready To Start" The Daily Show 8-12-10

The Daily Show With Jon StewartMon - Thurs 11p / 10c
Arcade Fire - Ready to Start
www.thedailyshow.com
Daily Show Full EpisodesPolitical HumorTea Party
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Soul Serenade: Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell, "If I Could Build My Whole World Around You" | Popdose

Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell

The story of Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell is one that ends tragically, but begins in glory. Together they stormed the charts in 1967 with a series of indelible soul pop classics that retain an honored place in popular culture to this day, and are among my favorite recordings in the soul canon.

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Soul Serenade: Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell, "If I Could Build My Whole World Around You" | Popdose
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CD Review: Eli 'Paperboy' Reed, "Come and Get It" | Popdose

elireed

Last year I saw Eli “Paperboy” Reed and his band the True Loves at the Stone Pony in Asbury Park. I came away a little disappointed. I’d been following their career for a year or so at that point, and their performance that night, while oozing with potential, seemed unfocused, and somewhat chaotic. Not long after that, I heard the news that they’d been signed to Capitol Records, and I was curious about what the label would do to, and for them.

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CD Review: Eli "Paperboy" Reed, "Come and Get It" | Popdose
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Video: David Bowie and the Arcade Fire, "Wake Up"

According to Wikipedia:

"On September 9, 2005, Arcade Fire appeared on the UK/U.S. television special "Fashion Rocks", on which David Bowie joined them for "Wake Up."

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Cratedigger: Jeff Beck, "Truth" | Popdose

truth

Jeff Beck’s sister was responsible for a nice chunk of rock and roll history when she fortuitously introduced him to another young guitarist named Jimmy Page. When Eric Clapton left the Yardbirds in 1965, the band called on Page to replace him. Page, in turn, recommended Jeff Beck. Three months later, in June of 1965, Page joined the band too, but as the bass player. Eventually Beck and Page shared the lead guitar spot from September to November in 1965. Beck only stayed with the Yardbirds long enough to record one album with the band, the Yardbirds album, which is today known as Roger the Engineer.

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Cratedigger: Jeff Beck, "Truth" | Popdose
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Soul Serenade: Gene McDaniels, "Tower of Strength" | Popdose

genemcdaniels

Gene McDaniels is an artist who saw success during the years between the rise of Elvis Presley, and the rise of the Beatles. Many people think that popular music was in the doldrums before the Beatles came along, but the fact is that some of the most amazing singles in pop music history were released in the early ’60s. Among those great records were two enormous hits by Gene McDaniels in 1961.

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Soul Serenade: Gene McDaniels, "Tower of Strength" | Popdose
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CD Review: Los Lobos, "Tin Can Trust" | Popdose

loslobos

Quick, name another band whose lineup has been intact for 26 years. Not that easy is it? Not these days, not any days. Los Lobos can claim that distinction. Steve Berlin (sax, keyboards) is the new guy. He joined in 1984. Cesar Rosas (guitar, vocals), David Hidalgo (guitar, violin, accordion, vocals), Louie Perez (guitar, drums, vocals), and Conrad Lozano (bass, vocals) have been together since 1973. Tin Can Trust, their first album of original material in four years, is also their first release for Shout! Factory. The new album features the sound of a band whose members are perfectly comfortable with each other, and remarkably, a band that is still moving forward in new directions.

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CD Review: Los Lobos, "Tin Can Trust" | Popdose
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CD Review: Mark Olson, "Many Colored Kite" } Popdose

markolson

“These are the days I remember.” With these words, Mark Olson opens his latest solo venture Many Colored Kite. These are good days for Olson, particularly coming as they do on the heels of the stormy times that he outlined in his 2007 album The Salvation Blues. The Jayhawks founder is a man who appreciates the gifts that he’s been given, and aims to enumerate them in song.

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CD Review: Mark Olson, "Many Colored Kite" | Popdose

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Soul Serenade: The Esquires, "Get On Up" | Popdoser

esquires

“Get On Up” by the Esquires was a huge record on the Atlantic City Boardwalk in the summer of 1967. It was a perfect song for the a cappella groups that lived for the echo, with its dynamic bass part and outstanding group harmonies. It seemed like everyone in town was singing it a


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Soul Serenade: The Esquires, "Get On Up" | Popdose

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Theatre Review: "One Child Born: The Music of Laura Nyro" | Popdose

kate31

I still vividly remember the first time I saw Laura Nyro perform. It was Christmas Eve, 1970. The venue was the fabled Fillmore East. It was a time of war, assassination, and Richard Nixon. What the country and everyone living in it needed, was healing. Some things never change. If you’ve ever been in New York City on Christmas Eve, you know that there’s magic in the air. Anything was possible that night, even a soothing of our troubled souls.


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Theatre Review: "One Child Born: The Music of Laura Nyro" | Popdose

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Cratedigger: The Wailers, "Burnin'" | Popdose

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Like many Americans, my first encounter with reggae came via Eric Clapton’s cover of “I Shot the Sheriff,” which was on his 1974 album 461 Ocean Boulevard. Clapton deserves praise for bringing this music to a wider audience, and his version of the Bob Marley song was sufficiently interesting that it sent me in search of the original. It was only when I found it, on the Wailers album Burnin’, that I realized how relatively tepid Clapton’s version was

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Cratedigger: The Wailers, "Burnin'" | Popdose

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Soul Serenade: Bobby Lewis, "Tossin' and Turnin'" | Popdose

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This week I bring you another one of those classic soul songs that I just couldn’t stop listening to back in the day. I played the 45 over and over at home, and when I was in a place that had a jukebox, the song demanded my spare change like a homeless man outside an Acoustic ’80s gig in the Village. The single was so infectious that I just had to hear more, resulting in one of my very first album purchases. It’s one of those albums that I managed to lose over the years, but that’s it, over there on the left.

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Soul Serenade: Bobby Lewis, "Tossin' and Turnin'" | Popdose

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DVD Review: The Rolling Stones, "Stones In Exile" | Popdose

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On May 18 of this year, the Rolling Stones released a remastered and expanded edition of what is arguably the greatest rock and roll album ever made, Exile On Main Street. You can read my review for Popdose here. Now Eagle Vision has released an hour-long companion DVD, Stones In Exile. The film was directed by Stephan Kijak, and produced by Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, and Charlie Watts, and it is a must for any Stones fan, or student of the history of rock and roll.

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DVD Review: The Rolling Stones, "Stones In Exile - Win a Copy! | Popdose

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Soul Serenade: Ben E. King, "Don't Play That Song (You Lied)" | Popdose

beneking

Everyone knows Ben E. King. He’s the guy who co-wrote and sang the immortal “Stand By Me,” which was a Top Ten hit in 1961, and again in 1987. True enough, but he is also a lot more than that. In 1958, still using his birth name, Benjamin Earl Nelson, the future Ben E. King became the lead singer of a doo wop group called the Drifters. He only recorded ten songs with the group, but among them were classics like “There Goes My Baby” (which he co-wrote), “This Magic Moment,” and the great Doc Pomus-Mort Shuman hit “Save the Last Dance For Me.”

Read more: Ken Shane | Popdose

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CD Review: Crowded House, "Intriguer" | Popdose

crowdedhouse

There aren’t many musical events more welcome than a new album from Crowded House. That’s largely because you know what you’re going to get, and I mean that in the best possible way: a collection of finely crafted songs, replete with lovely melodies, wistful, intelligent lyrics, and appealing harmonies. I’m happy to report that Intriguer (Fantasy Records/Concord Music Group) is no exception.

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CD Review: Crowded House, "Intriguer" | Popdose

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Cratedigger: Tom Rush, "Tom Rush" | Popdose

tomrush

In January of next year, Tom Rush will be 70 years old. The New Hampshire born folk-rock pioneer is still out there on the road, and still releasing albums, as he has been for nearly 50 years now. I’m not going to claim that I’ve been following his career for all of that time, but for a few years back in the ’60s and early ’70s, a new Tom Rush release was something that I looked forward to.

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Cratedigger: Tom Rush, "Tom Rush" | Popdose

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Soul Serenade: The Moonglows, "Sincerely" | Popdose

moonglows

Harvey Fuqua died on Tuesday. He was 80 years-old. Fuqua was from Louisville, KY, where in 1951 he founded a group called the Crazy Sounds. After the members of the group moved to Cleveland, they were taken under the wing of the legendary DJ Alan Freed, who renamed them the Moonglows.

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Soul Serenade: The Moonglows, "Sincerely" | Popdose

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Soul Serenade: "Do What You Gotta Do" (Three Covers) | Popdose

ninasimone

On Tuesday, my review of the new Jimmy Webb album, Just Across the River, ran on Popdose. If you read it, you know that I am a huge fan of Mr. Webb. The mp3 that I provided from the album was a song called “Do What You Gotta Do,” which, though it had been recorded by many other artists, had never been recorded by the songwriter himself until it appeared on the new album.

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Soul Serenade: "Do What You Gotta Do" (Three Covers) | Popdose

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CD Review: Alejandro Escovedo, "Street Songs of Love" | Popdose

alejandrostreetsongs

I’ll tell you one thing right from the jump; Alejandro Escovedo’s new album, Street Songs of Love (Fantasy/Concord Music Group), may be my favorite album of the year from a production standpoint. Of course one might expect as much when Tony Visconti is in the producer’s chair. Visconti was responsible for albums from a few minor characters called T. Rex, David Bowie, U2, and Morrissey back in the day. He knows a thing or two about how to make electric guitars sound, well, electric. Throw in some cool songs co-written by Escovedo and Chuck Prophet, and guest stints from Ian Hunter and some guy named Springsteen, and you have the makings of something pretty cool.

Read more: CD Review: Alejandro Escovedo, "Street Songs of Love" | Popdose

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CD Review: Jimmy Webb, "Just Across the River" | Popdose

webbriver

I have a lot to say about this album, so strap yourselves in. First off, I should tell you that Jimmy Webb has no bigger fan than me. He is far and away my favorite songwriter, and has been since I first heard “MacArthur Park” in 1968. He is undoubtedly one of the most important songwriters of the last 50 years. I own pretty much everything he’s ever put his name on be it vinyl, cassettes, CDs, or his 1998 book
Tunesmith. Everyone has their personal Jimmy Webb. He’s mine.

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CD Review: Jimmy Webb, "Just Across the River" | Popdose

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Cratedigger: Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, "Deja Vu"


dejavu

They were called the American Beatles. No one took that too seriously, but for a time they were the biggest band in the world, leaping into the vacuum created by the dissolution of the famous Liverpool quartet. For some, they were the classic supergroup, with four bona fide stars (hey, the Hollies had a lot of hits). For others, they were the personification of rock and roll excess. All of that means nothing to me because I write about music, and when it comes to music, you either have it, or you don’t. Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young had it, in spades.

Read more: Cratedigger: Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, "Deja Vu" | Popdose

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Soul Serenade: Bobby Brown, "Every Little Step"

bobbybrown

OK, I admit it. I know fuck-all about Bobby Brown. Week after week I use this space to pontificate about the great soul music of the past. You put up with it because I provide you with some pretty cool songs to download. If you’ve been following along, you already have the makings of a pretty good soul music compilation. This week, as a result of my overwhelming need to watch every moment of the World Cup, and my even more overwhelming need to earn a living, I’ve run out of time. So, this one’s a softball, well out my usual strike zone.

Read more: Soul Serenade: Bobby Brown, "Every Little Step" | Popdose

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CD Review: Oasis, "Time Flies ... 1994-2008"


oasistimeflies

“Oasis will become the premier gilt-edged rock ‘n’ rollers of the age; they will irreversibly change the way you walk and talk, the way you dress … the future’s assured. The past is gone. This is now. Listen. That’s the story.”
Was NME right when they wrote this in 1995? Well yes … and no. For a few years back in the ’90s, Oasis was the biggest band in the world, unless of course you include the United States as a part of the world. While the band was able to fill arenas here, they never attained the level of success that they did in England and the rest of the world.

Read more: CD Review: Oasis, "Time Flies ... 1994 - 2008 | Popdose

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Live Music: 2010 Non-CommVention


Simchock_Legend

Non-Comm is the annual Triple A radio conference hosted by WXPN in Philadelphia, and held at that city’s wonderful venue, World Cafe Live. The conference draws radio programmers from all over the country for a series of panels, seminars, and live music performances over the course of two and a half days. Since most artists are interested in an opportunity to impress radio people, the musical lineup tends to be strong every year, and features artists who would not normally be playing a venue the size of World Cafe Live. Best of all, tickets for most of the Non-Comm events are available to the general public.

Read more:
Live Music: 2010 Non-CommVention, Philadelphia, PA | Popdose


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CD Review: Pernice Brothers, "Goodbye, Killer"

pernice2

My review of the new Pernice Brothers album, Goodbye, Killer, has been posted to Popdose:

“There must come a time when a great artist gets tired of being just a critics darling, with a small but devoted band of hard core followers. When that happens, some artists make a mad dash to the center, trying desperately to make their mark on the mediocre middle. Others soldier on, doing what they do, making great music and living close to the vest. When the talk turns to the great ones, the ones that really made an impact, it’s that latter group that we tend to remember. Joe Pernice is one of them.”

Read more:
Ken Shane | Popdose http://popdose.com/tag/ken-shane/#ixzz0rE4rOXQd
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Soul Serenade: The Isley Brothers, "Work To Do"

isleybros

This week’s Soul Serenade column for Popdose features the Isley Brothers with their 1972 hit “Work To Do”:

Marvin Isley died on June 6. He was the youngest of the Isley Brothers, and together with his older brother Ernie Isley and brother-in-law Chris Jasper formed the instrumental force that was fused to the Isleys’ original vocal trio in 1973. Marvin held down the bass chair for the band until 1984, when the group split. The vocalists kept the Isley Brothers name, with the instrumentalists becoming Isley-Jasper-Isley. Marvin returned to the Isley Brothers in 1991, and remained with them until complications from diabetes put him on the sidelines in 1997.

Read more:
Ken Shane | Popdose http://popdose.com/tag/ken-shane/#ixzz0rE3TtaJi
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CD Review: Steve Cropper and Felix Cavaliere, "Midnight Flyer"

kenshane

My review of the new album from soul legends Steve Cropper and Felix Cavaliere, Midnight Flyer, has been posted to Popdose:

“You know these guys, at least you know their work. Between them, Steve Cropper and Felix Cavaliere were complicit in the creation of dozens of hit records in the ’60s and early ’70s. Guitarist Cropper was a mainstay in Booker T. and the MGs, and wrote and played on countless Stax classics, backing the likes of Otis Redding, Eddie Floyd, Wilson Pickett, and Sam & Dave. Felix Cavaliere rode the Hammond B-3 and was one of the lead vocalists of the Rascals, who defined blue-eyed soul with hits like “Groovin,” “People Got To Be Free,” and “Good Lovin’.”

Read more: Ken Shane | Popdose http://popdose.com/tag/ken-shane/#ixzz0rE3CF8pG
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Soul Serenade: Harold Melvin & the Bluenotes, "Wake Up Everybody"

haroldmelvin

My latest Soul Serenade column for Popdose features Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes and their hit “Wake Up Everybody”:

“Last weekend I attended a Triple-A radio conference in Philadelphia. The event is called Non-Comm (as in noncommercial radio), and I’ll be writing more about it soon. One of the highlights of the conference, which blends live music with industry panels, was the appearance of John Legend, performing with the Roots. The hometown heroes played a stunning set. Of special interest to me was a
audio_mp3_playcover of the song “Wake Up Everybody,” which was originally recorded in 1975 by Philly soul legends Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes.”

Read more: Soul Serenade: Harold Melvin & The Blue Notes, "Wake Up Everybody" | Popdose http://popdose.com/soul-serenade-harold-melvin-the-blue-notes-wake-up-everybody/#ixzz0rE27Kq4k
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CD Review: Delta Spirit, "History From Below" | Popdose

deltaspirit

My review of the new Delta Spirit album, History From Below, was posted to Popdose today:

“When Delta Spirit released their 2008 debut album
Ode To Sunshine, I quickly became a fan of the San Diego band. I appreciated the first-rate songwriting, and the impassioned delivery of lead vocalist and lyricist Matthew Vasquez. Not only that, but when I saw them play live in Philadelphia about a year ago, they used a really big drum. I have simple tastes, give me some good songs, crackling electric guitars, and really big drums, and you’re likely to get a good review from me here on Popdose.”

To read the entire review, please click
here.
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Cratedigger: The Paul Butterfield Blues Band, "The Paul Butterfield Blues Band" | Popdose

pbb

My latest Cratedigger column for Popdose features the debut album from the Paul Butterfield Blues Band:

“Forget about the incredibly cool music within. It was the cover that got me. More than almost any other image or song, the cover of the debut album by Chicago’s
Paul Butterfield Blues Band made me want to be a musician. There are actually two photos on the front cover of the album. In the top photo, five really hip looking guys, guitarist Mike Bloomfield, harmonica player/lead vocalist Paul Butterfield, drummer Sam Lay, rhythm guitar player Elvin Bishop, and bassist Jerome Arnold are standing in front of a storefront which advertises, “Incense, Herbs, Oils.” Before joining Butterfield, Lay and Arnold were Howlin’ Wolf’s rhythm section. The only person missing from the photo shoot is organist Mark Naftalin. The band’s original debut album was scrapped, and re-recorded after Naftalin joined the band, which probably accounts for him being missing in the photo.”

To read the entire column, please click
here.
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Soul Serenade: The Four Tops, "Ask the Lonely" | Popdose

fourtopslonely

My latest Soul Serenade column for Popdose features the Four Tops with their 1965 single “Ask the Lonely.”

Levi Stubbs never left. While Diana Ross split from the Supremes, Smokey Robinson migrated from his Miracles, and David Ruffin took off from the Temptations (ok, technically he was fired, but only after clearly demonstrating by his actions that he wanted out), Levi Stubbs never went solo. The offers must have been extensive, the opportunities endless. Still, Levi stayed. It could only have been out of love for his fellow Four Tops, at least I would like to think so. It was nearly 50 years before he left the group, and then only because his health was failing him. It’s one of the greatest stories in rock and roll.”

To read the entire column, please click
here.
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CD Review: Frank Sinatra - Antonio Carlos Jobim, "The Complete Reprise Recordings"

sinatrajobim

My review of Francis Albert Sinatra - Antonio Carlos Jobim: The Complete Reprise Recordings was posted to Popdose today:

When it comes to the music of romantic longing, it’s hard to top the songs of Antonio Carlos Jobim, especially when set to the languid bossa nova rhythms that he helped to pioneer. Add Frank Sinatra to the mix as a vocalist, and you have an unstoppable combination. In 1967, Sinatra and Jobim recorded the album Francis Albert Sinatra/Antonio Carlos Jobim for Sinatra’s Reprise Records. The album reached #18 on the Billboard chart, and stayed on the chart for 28 weeks, quite an achievement at the height of the rock era.”

To read the entire review, please click
here.
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CD Review: The Apples In Stereo, "Travellers In Space and Time" | Popdose

applesinstereo

My review of the new Apples In Stereo album, Travellers In Space and Time, has been posted to Popdose:

The new Apples In Stereo album, Travellers (sic) In Space and Time, finds the band traveling back to the ’70s and ’80s to dutifully recreate the sound of pop music at the time. Frontman Robert Schneider calls it “retro-futuristic super-pop.” Retro it certainly is, futuristic I certainly hope it is not, and super is quite a stretch. Let’s just say that I don’t get it. If you want to screw around in your studio, more power to you, but don’t ask people to pay for the privilege of hearing your musings. I am not generally given to writing negative reviews of indie-bands, but this just made me mad.”

To read the entire review, please click here.
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Soul Serenade: Gene Chandler, "Just Be True" | Popdose

genechandler

My latest Soul Serenade column for Popdose features Gene Chandler with his 1964 hit “Just Be True.”

“Last week I wrote about the Magnificent Men, and their hit “Peace of Mind.” One of the songs that the band included on their 1967 album “The Magnificent Men Live” was a cover of Gene Chandler’s 1964 hit “Just Be True.” It was one of those times when a great cover version of a song inspired me to seek out the original.”

To read the entire review, please click
here.
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CD Review: The Rolling Stones, "Exile On Main Street" (Original Recording Remastered) | Popdose

exile

My review of the remastered Deluxe Edition of the Rolling Stones Exile On Main Street has been posted to Popdose:


“A case could be made that Exile On Main Street (Universal) is the greatest rock and roll album ever made. After all, it’s got everything, from the full-tilt boogie of “Rip This Joint,” to the otherworldly blues of Slim Harpo’s “Shake Your Hips,” and the terrifying voodoo of the savage “Ventilator Blues.” There is the very noticeable influence of Gram Parsons (very much a part of the Stones camp in those days) on “Sweet Virginia,” and especially “Torn and Frayed.” Then there is “Tumbling Dice” which is arguably the greatest single ever made. If you can listen to the song without throwing your arms into the air and singing along ecstatically, check your pulse. The album’s only other single was the equally joyous “Happy,” which features a lead vocal from Keith Richards. A great Charlie Watts performance puts “Loving Cup” on the map, and I haven’t even mentioned the classic pure Stones tracks “All Down the Line,” “Stop Breaking Down,” and “Shine A Light.”

To read the entire review, please click
here.
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Soul Serenade: Garnet Mimms and the Enchanters, "A Quiet Place" | Popdose

mimms

My latest Soul Serenade column for Popdose features Garnet Mimms and the Enchanters with "A Quiet Place”:

I was in Atlantic City this morning. Despite the advent of the casino era, it remains a magical place for me, overflowing with childhood memories, including this one.

The first time I heard
audio_mp3_play“A Quiet Place” it was being sung by a four-part acapella choir on the boardwalk at Chelsea Avenue in Atlantic City. It must have been 1967 or 1968. I had never heard the song before, and I had no idea who the original artist was. For some reason the song stuck with me through the years.”

To read the entire column, please click
here.
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CD Review: Otis Redding, "Live On the Sunset Strip" | Popdose

otislive

My review of Otis Redding: Live On the Sunset Strip has just been posted to Popdose:

“By the time a 24 year-old Otis Redding arrived in Los Angeles in 1966 for appearances that included a Hollywood Bowl show with Donovan, Sonny & Cher, and the Mamas & the Papas, and a four-night Easter weekend stand at the Whiskey A Go Go on the Sunset Strip, he was an established star in the Stax galaxy. What hadn’t happened for Redding yet was crossover success. That would take place a little more than a year later when he performed at the Monterey International Pop Festival. The good news was that there was still an opportunity to see him in a small club with his smoking hot ten-piece road band.”

To read the entire review, please click
here.
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Soul Serenade: The Magnificent Men, "Peace of Mind"

magmen

My latest Soul Serenade column for Popdose features the Magnificent Men with their hit single “Peace of Mind”:

“When I first encountered the legend of the Magnificent Men, it was like something out of a movie. According to the story, this group of white kids from Harrisburg and York, PA were booked to play at the famous Uptown Theater in Philadelphia, a prime stop on what was called the “chitlin’ circuit” back in the day. Since the venue generally booked African-American artists, and given the sound of the band on record and radio, the audience had every expectation that they were there to see a band that was, well, black. When the curtain rose, revealing the band, I imagine a hush fell over the crowd, just as it did in the
Buddy Holly Story. The legend goes on to say that the band earned seven encores that night.”

To read the entire story, please click
here.
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TV Review: "When You're Strange: A Film About the Doors" | Popdose

doorsstrange

The first feature length documentary on The Doors, When You’re Strange: A Film About the Doors, debut on PBS American Masters tonight. My review has been posted to Popdose:

“You probably decided whether you are going to watch the latest installment of the great PBS series
American Masters tonight when you saw the title. Because when it comes to the Doors, opinion is most definitely divided. You either love the Doors, and think that they were one of the most important bands of the ’60s, or you dismiss them as overrated, and deride their lack of musicianship. I fall into the former category, but even here at Popdose some of my colleagues are in the latter. That’s fine. It’s differences in musical taste that make rock and roll the subject of endless discussions.”

To read the entire review, please click
here.
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CD Review: Everest, "On Approach" | Popdose

everest

My review of the new Everest album, On Approach, was posted to Popdose this morning:

“A funny thing happened to Everest on the road to releasing their second album. The plan was to release the album on Vapor Records, just as they had released their 2008 album,
Ghost Notes. Suddenly a sort of ’stop the presses’ e-mail appeared in my inbox shortly before the April 20 release date. It seems that Everest had a very successful SXSW showcase, so successful in fact that it resulted in the band jumping to Warner Brothers Records with their new album On Approach, which caused the album to be delayed for a few weeks. It’s here now though, and it’s living proof that once in awhile even the major record labels make a smart decision. Now we can only hope that the new album gets the marketing push that it so richly deserves.”

To read the entire review, please click
here.
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Cratedigger: Judy Collins, "Who Knows Where the Time Goes" | Popdose

judycollins

My latest Cratedigger column for Popdose features the classic Judy Collins album Who Knows Where the Time Goes:

If you were a songwriter in 1968, the singer that you wanted to cover your songs was Judy Collins. Not only did her beautiful voice compliment any song, you could also be sure that her rendition of your song would be respectful, and artistic.”

To read the entire column, please click
here.
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Soul Serenade: Aretha Franklin, "Ain't No Way" | Popdose

aretha

My latest Soul Serenade column for Popdose features Aretha Franklin with “Ain’t No Way”:

“The Queen of Soul. That’s quite a title, especially when you consider that there has never really been a King of Soul. Sure, James Brown was the Godfather, Ray Charles was the Genius, and Solomon Burke has appended ‘King’ to the front end of his name, but the King of Soul title remains vacant. So not only is the Queen of Soul title one that carries with it enormous respect, but it’s also one that Aretha Franklin has held for decades without any serious challengers to her throne. It’s a lifetime gig, like Pope.”

To read the entire column, please click
here.
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CD Review: Josh Ritter, "So Runs the World Away" | Popdose

josh ritter

My review of the new Josh Ritter album, So Runs the World Away, has been posted to Popdose:

Every once in awhile I have the opportunity to report on an artist who continues to grow and evolve with each new release. It’s one of the most gratifying things about what I do. Josh Ritter is such an artist. On his new album, So Runs the World Away (Pytheas Recordings), Ritter has found new worlds to explore, and in the process elevated his art to an even higher level. Not since Paul Simon, with whom Ritter shares a certain literary bent, has a songwriter proven more adept at further refining his craft with the release of each new album.”

To read the entire review, please click
here.
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Soul Serenade: David Ruffin, "Walk Away From Love" | Popdose

davidruffin

The latest entry in my Soul Serenade column for Popdose features the great David Ruffin with “Walk Away From Love.”

I have mixed feelings when it comes to telling people about some of the shows I’ve seen. After all, the Beatles in ‘64, Dylan in ‘65, and the Stones in ‘66 are pretty cool shows to have been to, and that’s just to name a few. On the other hand, it feels a little like bragging, and worst of all, it makes me just plain old. But I just love the sound of my own voice so much that I can’t help myself from spinning tales about the days when dinosaurs roamed the earth.”

To read the entire column, please click
here.
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CD Review: Big Audio Dynamite, "This Is Big Audio Dynamite (Legacy Edition)" | Popdose

bad

My review of the 25th anniversary Legacy reissue of This Is Big Audio Dynamite has been posted to Popdose:

“Big Audio Dynamite was born from the ashes of the Clash, something Mick (Jones) was never allowed to forget (hell, why should he!), and I was always aware of the shadow that the Clash cast over the band. It was against this backdrop that Big Audio Dynamite would try to make its mark. Mission impossible some would say… “
Don Letts

To read the entire review, please click here.
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Cratedigger: Joni Mitchell, "The Hissing of Summer Lawns" | Popdose

hissing

My latest Cratedigger column for Popdose looks back at Joni Mitchell’s classic album The Hissing of Summer Lawns.

Joni Mitchell is a long-time member of my personal pantheon. It’s a short list of artists who I revere not just for what they produce, but for the journey that informs their work, for their willingness to live on the edge artistically, and to blur the lines between genres. Miles Davis is another member. Picasso too. As I said, it’s short list.”

To read the entire article, please click
here.
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Soul Serenade: The Impressions, "I've Been Trying" | Popdose

impressions

The latest entry in my Soul Serenade column features the Impressions with their 1964 song “I’ve Been Trying.”

“The music of Curtis Mayfield and the Impressions was part and parcel of the civil rights movement in the 1960s. Beginning with the 1964 hit “Keep On Pushing,” the group’s music had an integral role in the struggle for equality.”

To read the entire column, please click
here.
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CD Review: Shelby Lynne, "Tears, Lies, and Alibis" | Popdose

shelbylynne

My review of the new Shelby Lynne album, Tears, Lies, and Alibis, has been posted to Popdose:

I love Shelby Lynne. I’m not given to starting my reviews with such proclamations, but I think it’s important that you know where I’m coming from. Not only is Shelby a great singer and songwriter, but next to my own beloved, she seems to be just about the coolest chick on the planet.”

To read the entire review, please click
here.
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Soul Serenade: King Curtis, "Soul Serenade"

kingcurtis

I have a new column at Popdose. It’s called “Soul Serenade” and each week I’ll feature one song from the great history of soul music. For my first entry, I feature the song which gave the column its name, “Soul Serenade” by King Curtis.

To read the column, please click here.
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CD Review: David Olney, "Dutchman's Curve" | Popdose

davidolney

My review of the new David Olney album, Dutchman’s Curve, has been posted to Popdose:

There is a group of great American songwriters who make the process seem so effortless that sometimes their brilliance is taken for granted. Their chord structures are simple, mostly played on acoustic guitars, and sometimes fleshed out with another instrument or two. The voices are deep, sometimes even gruff, but oddly soothing. The years of life on the road have caused them to move a little bit slower. They are past the point where they’re going to be trying anything new, but, but it’s the old stuff we want anyway. They still have stories to tell.”

To read the entire review, please click
here.
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CD Review: Matt Pond PA, "The Dark Leaves" | Popdose

mattpond

My review of the new Matt Pond PA album, The Dark Leaves, has been posted to Popdose:

“I don’t know how strange it’s been, but it has certainly been a long trip for Matt Pond PA. The band’s story begins in Philadelphia in 1998, before relocating to Brooklyn in 2003, leaving Matt Pond himself as the only original member of the band. The ever-changing lineup has crisscrossed the country in support of seven earlier albums, and a whole bunch of EPs and singles.”

To read the entire review, please click
here.
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Live Music: Wilco at the Wellmont Theatre in Montclair, NJ 4/2/10 | Popdose

wilco

My review of last week’s Wilco show at the Wellmont Theatre in Montclair, NJ has been posted to Popdose:

“The venerable Wellmont Theatre in Montclair, New Jersey, began life as a legitimate theatre in 1922 before being converted to a movie theatre in 1929. The venue fell on hard times in recent years, was shuttered in 2006, and found new life as a concert hall in 2008. Last week, alt-Americana icons Wilco rode into Montclair for a sold out two-night stand at the Wellmont, and the old place will never be the same.”

To read the entire review, please click
here.
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CD Review: Martin Sexton, "Sugarcoating" | Popdose

martinsexton

My review of the new album by Martin Sexton, Sugarcoating, has been posted to Popdose:

“I am certainly not about to knock any songwriter who includes a song called “Shane” on his album. In this case, Martin Sexton is writing about his son, but his message is certainly one I could have taken to heart when I was a younger person. I would like to think my own father shared these same sentiments with me, in his own way:

So catch a little cold
Get a little heat
Expect to fall when you take a stand
Just land on your feet
Break a few hearts
Bend a few rules
If there’s water in the pond
Dive into the deep end”

If you would like to read the entire article, please click here.
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CD Review: Dr. Dog, "Shame, Shame" | Popdose

drdog

My review of the new Dr. Dog album, Shame, Shame, has been posted to Popdose:

“I like the good old three chord rock and roll as much as any other jaded music writer does. But I also like innovation. I love hearing young bands trying out new things. And no, a bunch of synthesizers playing over drum loops are not what I would call new things. For several years, and over the course of several albums, I’ve been trying to cozy up to Philadelphia’s Dr. Dog because they are clearly an innovative young band who, while they respect the value of a great song, seem to always be looking for new ways to present it. Unfortunately, I have found that to this point the magic has proved elusive for them when it comes to their studio work. I saw their live show a couple of years ago and loved it. I just couldn’t connect with the albums. I recognized and respected what they were up to, but it all seemed just a little precious to me. The effort that they spent making it look effortless was simply too obvious.”

To read the entire review, please click
here.
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CD Review: Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings, "I Learned the Hard Way" | Popdose

sharonjones

My review of the new album from Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings, I Learned the Hard Way, has been posted to Popdose:

“Retro-soul is a musical style in which contemporary artists attempt to recapture the sound and feel of the great soul music of the ’60s and early ’70s. Musical touchstones include the sounds of Motown, Stax, and Gamble and Huff’s Philadelphia International Records. Among the artists who are purveying this style these days are Ryan Shaw, Black Joe Lewis and the Honeybears, and The Revelations featuring Tre Williams. I would include Joss Stone’s first album, but she’s moved in a more pop-oriented direction since then. Raphael Saadiq and Maxwell are often thought of more often as neo-soul artists (a genre that fuses ’70s soul with hip-hop, jazz, and funk), but there is definitely a retro element in what they do.”

To read the entire review, please click
here.
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CD Review: Keith Monacchio, "The Long Evening" | Popdose

keithmonacchio

My review of the first solo album from NJ songwriter Keith Monacchio has been posted to Popdose:

“The general theme of this record is trying to find balance in your life and being okay with decisions, mistakes, and even triumphs. Being satisfied with whatever world you’ve carved out for yourself. I talk about foundations or “home” a lot through this group of songs. I think everyone, at least myself, is trying to find that sense of “home” that you felt as a kid growing up in your childhood home. Trying to build something like that in my adult life has become more important, as the years have passed.”
Keith Monacchio

To read the entire review, please click
here.
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DVD Review: "British Invasion" | Popdose

britishinvasion

My review of the new British Invasion DVD series, featuring the Small Faces, Dusty Springfield, Gerry & the Pacemakers, and Herman’s Hermits, was posted to Popdose today:

“On February 7, 1964, the Beatles arrived in America, and everything changed. When I say everything, I don’t just mean music. The world was never the same. The societal upheaval was simply unprecedented. The new found freedom the Liverpool quartet inspired would have profound consequences, both positive and negative, for generations to come. And the Beatles were not alone. Behind them marched an army of young British musicians determined to conquer America. This movement of musical troops across our borders became known at the British Invasion.”

To read the entire review, please click
here.
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Cratedigger: Simon & Garfunkel, "Bookends" | Popdose

bookends

My latest Cratedigger column for Popdose features the classic 1968 album Bookends, by Simon & Garfunkel:

“1968 was one of the most epochal years in American history. There is no need to go into the history again here, but believe me, it was a whirlwind. While most of the events of that year – war, assassination, the election of Richard Nixon – are remembered in a negative light, the year was not without its highlights. What is most fondly remembered about 1968 is the music. Musical giants were prowling the earth. You’ve heard their names. You’ve heard the music. The events of that year were inextricably linked to the music in a way that hasn’t been replicated since then.”
To read the entire articles, please click
here.
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DVD Review: The T.A.M.I. Show | Popdose

tami

My review of the first-ever DVD release of the legendary T.A.M.I. Show has been posted to Popdose:

“The famous story goes that T.A.M.I. Show (Shout Factory) Executive Producer Bill Sargent wanted the Rolling Stones to close the show. The Stones, however, had seen James Brown’s act, and were not eager to follow him. Brown wasn’t too happy about the scheduling either, apparently promising to make the Stones sorry that they ever came to America. Sargent was insistent however, and the Stones did close the show. There were no casualties, and the T.A.M.I. Show went on to become one of the most legendary shows in the history of rock and roll.”

To read the entire review, please click
here.
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Popdose Flashback '90: Social Distortion, "Social Distortion" | Popdose

flashback90

I contributed the latest installment of our Popdose Flashback ’90 series. My article recalls the 1990 major label debut of Social Distortion:

“For some people, Social Distortion is the very definition of a rock and roll band. After all, they have everything the average rock fan could ask for – the sizzling electric guitars; the pounding drums and thudding bass; the seamless blend of rockabilly, country, and punk influences; the lyrics about hard-bitten loners, hopeless losers, broken-hearted lovers, and working class heroes. The tattoos. The thing is, if everyone who says that they’re into Social D, and throws up the two-fingered “RAWK!!!” sign every time their name is mentioned was actually a fan, the band would be more than the cult (albeit a large cult) band that they are.”

To read the entire article, please click
here.
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Alex Chilton Remembered | Popdose


Alex Chilton

The Popdose staff remembers Alex Chilton:

“Alex Chilton died in New Orleans of an apparent heart attack on Wednesday night. According to his wife Laura, he was out mowing the grass when he collapsed. He was immediately taken to the hospital where he died. Alex was 59 years old, and had been living in the Crescent City since leaving his hometown of Memphis in the early 1980s. In addition to his wife, Alex is survived by his son Timothy.”

To read the entire article, please click
here.
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